73. This is from what I eat, not what I do, which is Crossfit

Uncategorized Oct 06, 2020

At 47 years of age Aaron gets compliments often on how he looks. 

It makes sense. He has been at single digit body fat levels for 20 months. 

He tells his gym buddies "This is from what I eat, not what I do." They Crossfit together and talk about workout and nutrition methods all the time.

They usually run a program for a few months, be it exercise or nutrition and then get bored and switch to another one. 

A few times Aaron has almost caved and joined them until we chat and realize he would gain little to nothing from trying a new strategy. His body fat doesn't have a higher ceiling for improvement as it has been in singled digits for quite a while and his fitness abilities are good enough to keep him healthy and injury free for four years. 

"Sometimes I think it would be fun to try and get as lean as I ever have. Or to do something different program wise to get my lifts stronger. But I always circle back to that being  unnecessary because the returns compared to the cost are tiny. My fitness and nutrition are as good as they get. I would rather spend the time and energy a change would take on something else."

Yes, boredom is real when you reach a state like Aaron. But I make a case for boredom by suggesting that when you feel it that means you are almost there. The destination you're after is relaxation and it is the result of building so much skill that no nutrition situation or fitness encounter presents much of a challenge. 

So when you feel bored keep going, that means you have almost made it. The relaxed state is like that of Yoda, a Jedi Master or Bruce Lee, a martial arts master. Hardly anything causes them to be anxious or worried because their skill levels are so high. 

Pushing into boredom and maintaining your discipline is not common in our society. For most, when boredom sets in the habit is to add something new to the mix or change courses all together. What a total mistake. 

Close

50% Complete

Two Step

Resources, ideas, and tips for improving your nutrition, activity, and lifestyle